No more US sanctions for Cuba

White House says measures will “end our outdated approach,” promote change in Cuba consistent “with US national security interests”

Oddly, during a week when President Obama prepares to launch new sanctions against Venezuela and Russia, The White House admits that sanctions do not work.

“It is clear that decades of US isolation of Cuba have failed to accomplish our enduring objective of promoting the emergence of a democratic, prosperous, and stable Cuba,” the Obama administration declared.

Diplomatic relations between the United States and Cuba were severed in January 1961 after the rise of Fidel Castro and his Communist government.

Obama has now instructed Secretary of State John Kerry to immediately initiate discussions with Cuba about reestablishing diplomatic relations and to begin the process of removing Cuba from the list of states that sponsor terrorism, which it has been on since 1982, the White House said.

 In coming months, the US “will re-establish an embassy in Havana and carry out high-level exchanges and visits between our two governments as part of the normalization process”.
The US will thus lift sanctions on Cuban nationals outside Cuba.

The initial step will involve US-Cuba Migration Talks in January after which institutions will be allowed to open accounts at Cuban financial institutions for authorized transactions and US credit, debit cards permitted for use by travelers to Cuba.

But in 2010, the same Obama administration warned the world against Cuba:

Recent events in Cuba, including the tragic death of Orlando Zapata Tamayo, the repression visited upon Las Damas de Blanco, and the intensified harassment of those who dare to give voice to the desires of their fellow Cubans, are deeply disturbing.

These events underscore that instead of embracing an opportunity to enter a new era, Cuban authorities continue to respond to the aspirations of the Cuban people with a clenched fist.

Today, I join my voice with brave individuals across Cuba and a growing chorus around the world in calling for an end to the repression, for the immediate, unconditional release of all political prisoners in Cuba, and for respect for the basic rights of the Cuban people.

During the course of the past year, I have taken steps to reach out to the Cuban people and to signal my desire to seek a new era in relations between the governments of the United States and Cuba. I remain committed to supporting the simple desire of the Cuban people to freely determine their future and to enjoy the rights and freedoms that define the Americas, and that should be universal to all human beings.